Monday, December 11, 2017

Why Preschool Shouldn’t Be Like School

April 5, 2016 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

Without a teacher present, children look for a much wider range of information and consider a greater range of options. Knowing what to expect from a teacher is a really good thing, of course: It lets you get the right answers more quickly than you would otherwise. Indeed, these studies show that 4-year-olds understand how teaching works and can learn from teachers. But there is an intrinsic trade-off between that kind of learning and the more wide-ranging learning that is so natural for young children. ..

Body Centered Listening, part 2

March 6, 2016 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

Whole body listening doesn’t have to involve your ears at all. It can take place completely inside your body. It is all about identifying how things feel to you, and then making a decision based on whether something feels “good,” or “not so good.”

Heart Centered Listening vs Body Centered Listening.

February 12, 2016 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

If your child (or someone else) screaming “I want to stay!!!!!” Makes you want to scram and extinguish that screeching…

Your Family Values

September 24, 2015 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

If it’s not a YES, it’s a NO. Nothing good comes of living in ‘maybe-land.’ ;)

When a Parent’s ‘I Love You’ Means ‘Do as I Say’

August 22, 2015 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

When a Parent’s ‘I Love You’ Means ‘Do as I Say’

Taking a Step Back….

June 14, 2015 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

My critical self-judgment has probably been the most difficult thing to overcome in being parent. It seems I am never enough. whew. I never do enough for my children, don’t do it well enough, don’t love them enough, I’m not patient enough with them, not energetic enough for them, not sweet enough for them. That condemning JUDGE inside me tells me in so many ways how I am simply NOT enough.

Are You Listening…?

April 15, 2015 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

I have been putting my attention on listening lately.

I was thinking about a conflict the other day that involved my son and myself. I realized that ‘conflict resolution,’ per se, doesn’t truly exist when the conflict is between the two of us. And that is because I have an agenda. You see, I think I know the better way, the better tactic, the “truth,” and even before I let my son explain his thoughts and intentions, I am already formulating my response.

Empathy vs Sympathy: Do you care more about your child’s feelings or your own?

November 30, 2014 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

There is a fine line between sympathy and empathy. Learning the difference can make huge changes in your relationship with your child. My mother was a professional worrier. Whenever I expressed having a problem with anything, she sympathized, “Oh my poor dear. That’s so awful. Do you really have to do that?” Her sympathy was not helpful. As a matter of fact, I stopped sharing my problems with her because then I had her feelings and worry to deal with as well as my own problem.

Compassionate Listening = Listening to Ourselves with Compassion

November 21, 2014 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

The reason why I created a non violent preschool for my son, and the reason why I am on the hunt for a humanitarian school (or at the very least a compassionate teacher) for his elementary school experience, is completely selfish: I was a troubled child. I was the hard one. I had BIG emotions, and they were usually not understood. (OK, I admit it…I am STILL the troubled child, and I STILL have BIG emotions!)

FREEDOM TO LEARN: The roles of play and curiosity as foundations for learning

October 31, 2014 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

If anything makes Americans stand tall internationally it is creativity. “American ingenuity” is admired everywhere. We are not the richest country (at least not as measured by smallest percentage in poverty), nor the healthiest (far from it), nor the country whose kids score highest on standardized tests (despite our politicians’ misguided intentions to get us there), but we are the most inventive country. We are the great innovators, specialists in figuring out new ways of doing things and new things to do. Perhaps this derives from our frontier beginnings, or from our unique form of democracy with its emphasis on individual freedom and respect for nonconformity. In the business world as well as in academia and the arts and elsewhere, creativity is our number one asset. In a recent IBM poll, 1,500 CEOs acknowledged this when they identified creativity as the best predictor of future success.[1]

It is sobering, therefore, to read Kyung Hee Kim’s recent research report documenting a continuous decline in creativity among American schoolchildren over the last two or three decades.[2]

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