Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Growing Up Looks Neurotic… All the Way to 100!

March 10, 2016 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

Growing through childhood can look really neurotic… and then in puberty it’s the same all over again. That’s because those are two of the times your brain reorganizes itself. Pregnancy and post natal are two more periods that look really neurotic, and I’m sure there are even more as we grow older. I’m sure 65, 80, and 100 may be really big ones…

Body Centered Listening, part 2

March 6, 2016 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

Whole body listening doesn’t have to involve your ears at all. It can take place completely inside your body. It is all about identifying how things feel to you, and then making a decision based on whether something feels “good,” or “not so good.”

Heart Centered Listening vs Body Centered Listening.

February 12, 2016 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

If your child (or someone else) screaming “I want to stay!!!!!” Makes you want to scram and extinguish that screeching…

“A human nurtured instead of shamed, and loved instead of driven by fear, develops a different brain and therefore a different mind.

January 31, 2016 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

“A human nurtured instead of shamed, and loved instead of driven by fear, develops a different brain and therefore a different mind. He will not act against the well-being of another nor against his larger body, the living Earth.”

Raising Entitled Children

January 15, 2016 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

Several of the schools Kian attended over the last 5 years gave us both the feeling that he was being programmed to “fit in.” The implication there is that something about his authentic self was somehow in need of repair or renovation. Attention to “fitting in” can make a person learn the “eggshell walk” at an early age.

A good explanation for why we don’t force sharing….

December 6, 2015 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

THE DAILY GROOVE ~ by Scott Noelle www.enjoyparenting.com/dailygroove :: Goodness Is Inspired, Not Required :: Situation 1: You ask your friend what she wants for a birthday gift, and she says, “I would treasure *any* gift from you!” Wouldn’t you feel inspired to give her something very special? Situation 2: Another friend says, “I hope […]

What do Birds Know that We Don’t?

November 15, 2015 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

Just yesterday I just had a wake-up call about my relationship with my 4 year old son. It began as I held another child for 40 minutes while he cried for no reason apparent to me, or to any of the other teachers. There was nothing obvious to “fix,” so I did what I could: I simply held him and allowed him to cry. I didn’t try to jiggle him out of it. I didn’t try to joke with him, or cheer him up, or even reassure him about some fears I could imagine he might be having. I had absolutely no idea why he was crying, so I just let him cry. While he was crying, I periodically checked in with him: “Would you like to call your Mom?”

Your Family Values

September 24, 2015 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

If it’s not a YES, it’s a NO. Nothing good comes of living in ‘maybe-land.’ ;)

When a Parent’s ‘I Love You’ Means ‘Do as I Say’

August 22, 2015 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

When a Parent’s ‘I Love You’ Means ‘Do as I Say’

My 5th Grader’s Surprising Choice for Schooling this Year…..

August 12, 2015 by  
Filed under Parenting From Balance©

Have you ever watched a cat shift its ears like furry radar dishes, surveying the terrain, all the while calmly relaxing and purring? My brain was like that cat; my awareness was a due to a radar-like brain function that I was not particularly keen on desensitizing. I would prefer to alter my environment, than alter that perfectly operating function in my brain.

Pressure has no place in a learning environment. It is counter to the goal, in fact. Pressure creates cortisol rushes that burn through healthy brain networks and, left uncorrected, the stimulation can create new cortisol pathways that actual seek to fill themselves again and again in an addictive cycle. Think of a child sitting on the edge of his seat, neck craned, eyes bugged out, peering at a video game screen, for example. That looks like a cortisol rush unfolding to me. Video games can do it, and so can crowded, noisy, or distracting atmospheres wherein a child is expected to perform.

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